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Overview

Title: Long Term Follow-up on Tibial to Peroneal Nerve Transfer.
PNS ID: 110330-1, Published: 3/30/2011, Updated: 3/30/2011.

Author(s): Andrew Yee BS, Susan E. Mackinnon MD.
Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.

Figures and Videos

Video 1 – Long Term Follow-up Post-operative Tibial to Peroneal Nerve Transfer.  Five years following the tibial to peroneal nerve transfer of the left leg, the patient significantly recovered tibialis anterior. However, the recipient peroneus longus and brevis (foot eversion) did not recover. The patient was able to dorsiflex the left foot against significant resistance with the tibialis anterior tendon visible. When compared to the normal right side, the range-of-motion of the left ankle was smaller. The left foot also demonstrated inversion due to the absent function of the peroneus eversion muscles.
 

Video 2- Post-operative Examination of the Donor Deficit. The tibial nerve branch to the soleus was used as a donor nerve to reinnervate the tibialis anterior. The tibial nerve branch to the lateral gastrocnemius was used as a donor nerve to reinnervate the peroneus longus and brevis. The patient did not exhibit a function-limiting donor deficit. The patient was able to plantarflex the left foot against gravity without difficulty despite visible wasting of the lateral head of the gastrocnemius. The patient was able to plantarflex the left foot against resistance.


Video 3 – Post-operative Gait Examination. Five years following the tibial to peroneal nerve transfer, the patient demonstrated an excellent ability to walk and run. However, the left foot is slightly inverted due to the absent function of the peroneus eversion muscles. The patient reported excellent recovery a year and a half following nerve transfer..